Lacy Krueger

LacyKrueger

I am an associate professor of psychology and the undergraduate psychology program coordinator.  I received my Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. My primary research interests lie within the domain of metamemory and individual differences in memory, and how these topics apply to educational, gerontological, and legal fields.  My specific research interests include how people's beliefs about their own memory, knowledge about how memory works, and the ability to monitor the accuracy of their memory contribute to memory performance.  Furthermore, I study individual difference factors (e.g., age) associated with memory performance.

Email: lacy.krueger@tamuc.edu

Metacognition Lab

Representative Publications

            * Denotes student co-author

Metacognition Articles

Carmichael*, A. M., & Krueger, L. E. (2014). An examination of factors and attitudes that influence reporting fraudulent claims in an academic environment. Active Learning in Higher Education,

15(2), 173–185. doi: 10.1177/1469787414527389

Krueger, L. E. (2012). Age-related effects of study time allocation on memory performance in a verbal and a spatial task. Educational Gerontology, 38(9), 604-615. doi: 10.1080/03601277.2011.595327

Dodson, C. S., & Krueger, L., E. (2006).  I misremember it well: Why older adults are unreliable eyewitnesses. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 13, 770-775.doi:10.3758/BF03193995

Individual Differences Articles

Ayers*, J. M., Krueger, L. E., & Jones, B. A. (2015). Effects of labeling and teacher certification type on recall and conflict resolution. The Journal of Educational Research, 108(6), 435-448. doi: 10.1080/00220671.2014.909767

Krueger, L. E., & Salthouse, T. A. (2010). Differences in acquisition, not retention, largely contribute to sex differences in multitrial word recall performance. Personality & Individual Differences, 49(7)768-772.doi:10.1016/j.paid.2010.06.0245000303

Teaching Article

Krueger, L. E. (In press). Selecting stimuli for a memory self-efficacy and multitrial verbal learning study.

SAGE Research Methods Cases – Psychology.