First Year TRACS :: Welcome copied not edited copied not edited

TRANSFORMING RELATIONSHIPS and Academic CONNECTIONS

The First-Year TRAC program will immerse you in a range of challenging and rewarding experiences, all designed to help you get connected and create a pathway to success.

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AS PART OF YOUR FIRST-YEAR TRAC YOU WILL

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First-Year TRAC: FLC Class and Scholarship

First-Year Leadership Class

Are you an incoming student with demonstrated high school excellence who is interested in being active and engaged in the community and academics?

You could be eligible for the First-Year Leadership Class and a $2,000 scholarship for your Fall and Spring terms during your first year.

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First Year TRAC :: Signature Courses

SIGNATURE COURSES

Faculty across disciplines apply to teach signature courses that highlight their knowledge and passion for a specific subject area. They are designed to introduce you, a new college student, to a life of intellectual curiosity, and introduce you to full-time faculty members immediately upon arriving at A&M-Commerce. Signature courses include peer mentor cohorts led by upperclassmen.

As part of your signature course experience, you will participate in The Lionizing, a culminating semester-end event where you will present a project from the course in the genre of the instructor’s choice.

Fall 2022

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Business, Society and Unfettered Thought

Guclu Atinc, Associate Professor of Management

Explore the critical thinking skills needed to manage the increasingly integrated, interdependent and complex relationship between business and society. Through discussion and breakdown of case studies, you will use knowledge gained in this course to solve societal and organizational problems in a socially responsible and ethical manner and gain the ability to successfully communicate solutions across audiences.

The Graphic Past

Cynthia Ross, Assistant Professor of History

Explore award-winning graphic novels, their depiction of four key historical events of the twentieth century, and related themes in world history. Events include the bombing of Hiroshima, the Holocaust, the Iranian Revolution and European colonialism in Southeast Asia. You will learn about building visual narratives and use this knowledge to create your own mini-graphic novel around a key theme explored in this course. No drawing expertise needed!

A professor standing with books
A professor stands pondering in front of glass whiteboard

Learning How to Think Critically

Brandon Randolph-Seng, Associate Professor of Management

Examine the effects of attitudes, values and logical fallacies on critical thinking and problem-solving. Using the knowledge gained through this course, you will confront real-life situations to better understand the varied levels of the critical thinking processes.

#LivingYourBestLife

Sharonda Pruitt, Assistant Professor of History

Explore your personal history, where you are currently and where you want to go beyond college. You will learn more about yourself and how your prior educational experiences and current college experience will shape your future and career by exploring the community you left behind, what your life will look like in college and imagining your life after graduation.

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A professor sits with books

Great Texts and Great Conversations

Mark Menaldo, Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Liberal Studies

You will be introduced to a timeless core text that will open you up to a larger world. Through guided reading and discourse, you will dive deeper into perspectives and thoughtful discussion that the chosen text provides. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to have more thought-provoking discussions as a result of the material covered.

Spring 2023

An instructor in wizard apparel stands between isles of books

Wizarding World of Harry Potter

George Swindell, Instructor for the College of Innovation and Design

Use the universe created in Harry Potter to explore areas of self-identity, social issues, personal relationships and more. From psychological aspects of self-exploration and philosophical discussions of good vs. evil through seven books, nine movies and a Broadway play, you will discuss the lessons learned in this series and how those lessons can apply to your own life.

Humor in the Humanities

Christian Hemplemann, Assistant Professor of Computational Linguistics

Discuss major historical, social, psychological and communicative concepts through the positive and negative aspects of humor. In this course, you will learn to develop critical thinking habits and greater analysis and value judgements by learning to write your own jokes. As a result, you will have a greater understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of humor and how it relates to the larger world.

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A professor stands holding an oversized copy of the book Frederick

The Power of Stories and Words

Josh Thompson, Professor of Early Childhood Education

Young children bring tremendous capacity and energy to the task of learning their first language. The work you do during your first year of college replicates this as you begin to shift toward adulthood. You will use the experiences during your first year to master certain ways of learning and knowing, from academics to self-awareness of your own learning processes that will help you succeed in cultivating your own life of the mind.

Great Texts and Great Conversations

Mark Menaldo, Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Liberal Studies

You will be introduced to a timeless core text that will open you up to a larger world. Through guided reading and discourse, you will dive deeper into perspectives and thoughtful discussion that the chosen text provides. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to have more thought-provoking discussions as a result of the material covered.

A professor sits with books

A professor standing with books

The Graphic Past

Cynthia Ross, Assistant Professor of History

Explore award-winning graphic novels, their depiction of four key historical events of the twentieth century, and related themes in world history. Events include the bombing of Hiroshima, the Holocaust, the Iranian Revolution and European colonialism in Southeast Asia. You will learn about building visual narratives and use this knowledge to create your own mini-graphic novel around a key theme explored in this course. No drawing expertise needed!

Learning to Think

Brandon Randolph-Seng, Associate Professor of Management

Examine the effects of attitudes, values and logical fallacies on critical thinking and problem-solving. Using the knowledge gained through this course, you will confront real-life situations to better understand the varying levels of the critical thinking processes.

A professor stands pondering in front of glass whiteboard

Star Lore

Cheri Davis, Planetarium Director

Learn about star lore, discover and recognize constellation patterns, understand how to navigate the night sky, explore what is in a name, and discuss pop culture influences such as Harry Potter and other literature.

Business, Society and Unfettered Thought

Guclu Atinc, Associate Professor of Management

Explore the critical thinking skills needed to manage the increasingly integrated, interdependent and complex relationship between business and society. Through discussion and breakdown of case studies, you will use knowledge gained in this course to solve societal and organizational problems in a socially responsible and ethical manner and gain the ability to successfully communicate solutions across audiences.

A professor using a tablet device

Hidden Ruins from the Forgotten Past: An Introduction to Archaeology

Andrew Donnelly, Assistant Professor of History

Troy! Pompeii! Machu Picchu! These names have enticed and thrilled many over the years. Join Dr. Donnelly for a semester-long adventure to examine some of the world’s most exciting ancient ruins, cities and temples. You will hear about the people who built these massive places, how they were lost and found again, what secrets were uncovered by their archaeological excavators, and the information learned about the people who left behind these rich legacies.

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First Year TRACS :: 1.8 INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES copied not edited

Peer mentor

Your mentor group is part of your signature course and the piece of TRAC that holds it all together. Each mentor group will serve 25 students. These mentors are paid undergraduate students who will be trained to help us:

  • Deliver student success content related to navigating college, goal setting, time management, resiliency and more
  • Create cohorts within the freshman class
  • Guide students to resources on campus
  • Guide students to First-Year TRAC events hosted by various offices
A group of people sitting down in a circle listening to a therapist.

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First Year TRACS :: We are Here to Help! copied not edited copied not edited

Meet OUR Staff

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First Year TRACS :: Contact copied not edited copied not edited

Contact Us

  • P.O. Box 3011
  • Commerce, TX 75429-3011
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START YOUR JOURNEY! Two buttons

START YOUR JOURNEY!

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