I believe that all organizations have room for improvement and good management science is on the leading edge of providing answers that will change organizations for the better.

Brandon Randolph-Seng, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Management

  • Faculty
Management
Contact
Office
McDowell Administration 336
Related Department
Management and Economics

When he applied to work at A&M-Commerce, he had never heard of it. When he arrived at the airport for his interview, the lady at the desk hadn’t either. What he found when he arrived on campus was what he later described as a “hidden gem”. Now, as an Associate Professor of Management with 8 years of experience since his first visit to campus, he has seen some of that hidden potential realized and sees many more opportunities on the horizon for the community he has come to love.

A Conversation with Dr. Randolph-Seng

What draws you to your discipline?

“Management science strives to pull from the best theory and research in the social sciences and apply that work to discovering, understanding and improving the organizational contexts we interact with and work in on a daily basis. I was drawn to this interdisciplinary and applied approach. I believe that all organizations have room for improvement and good management science is on the leading edge of providing answers that will change organizations for the better.”

Tell us a little about yourself (educational background, research interests, etc.)

“Collectively, my research has been cited over 1000 times. I teach mainly organizational ethics and behavior-related courses both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. My recent consulting experience is in the public sector, ranging from local municipalities to larger defense-related contractors. I also serve as Editor-in-Chief for the journal Management Decision.”

Tell us about a project you are currently working on or recently completed.

“As Editor-in-Chief of Management Decision and in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, I am leading a special issue titled, “Management in Crisis: Viruses, Earthquakes and Tornadoes, Oh My!” The purpose of this special issue is to provide the business community, who are on the front lines of this pandemic, good theory to correctly guide action by turning scientific knowledge into practical wisdom.”

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Texas Tech University, 2009
  • MS, Georgia Southern University, 2004
  • BS, Weber State University, 1999

Academic Positions

  • Associate Professor, Texas A&M University-Commerce, 2017-present
  • Assistant Professor, TAMUC, 2012-2017

Awards and Honors

  • Nominee, TAMUC Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities Award Fearless Investigation, 2020
  • Emerald Award for Excellence: Outstanding Author Contribution for Research in Ethical Issues in Organizations, 2019
  • Nominee, TAMUC Lafferty Research Award, 2018
  • Sage Publishers Award for Best Management History Division in Leadership Paper, 2015

Research Interests

  • Ethical and social cognitive factors in leadership, entrepreneurship and teams

Professional Organizations

  • Academy of Management (Entrepreneurship & Organizational Behavior)
  • Southwest Academy of Management
  • Southern Management Association

Selected Publications

  • Randolph-Seng, B., Clarke, J. S., & Atinc, Y. “Dynamic entrepreneurial cognition: Current trends and future opportunities.” Management Decision. In press.
  • Kessler, S. R., Mahoney, K. T., Randolph-Seng, B., Martinko, M. J., & Spector, P. “The effects of attribution style and stakeholder role on blame for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.” Business & Society, 58, 1572-1598. 2019.
  • Martinko, M. J., Randolph-Seng, B., Shen, W., Brees, J. R., Mahoney, K. T., & Kessler, S. R. “An examination of the influence of implicit theories, attribution styles, and performance cues on questionnaire measures of leadership.” Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 25, 116-133. 2018.
  • Guenter, H., Gardner, W. L., McCauley, K. D., Randolph-Seng, B., & Prabhu, P. V. Shared authentic leadership in scientific research teams: Role of shared mental models, trust, and coordination. Small Group Research, 48, 719-765. 2017.

Featured Courses

MGT 315 Organizational Behavior
MGT 497 Groups & Teams
MGT 567 Managing Groups & Teams
MGT 585 Management & Organizational Behavior

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